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The Best Professional Development In your experience, what professional development...

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engtchr5 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted December 3, 2008 at 4:47 AM via web

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The Best Professional Development

In your experience, what professional development activity has most benefitted your teaching career? I have been through programs as diverse as Kagan, CRISS, Willard Daggett's seminars, and Harry Wong. Over the long haul, however, I've found that a lot of the training I received in actual education classes has been most beneficial.

Speaking of which (slightly off topic), I will soon be taking the GRE to pursue my master's. If anyone has excellent study guides they can suggest or even sell, please let me know. --End of shameless plug --

Here's the bottom line: whatever professional development activities have most impacted your teaching, those are the ones others will most likely benefit from, as well. List them here, s'il vous plait...

9 Answers | Add Yours

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linda-allen | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted December 3, 2008 at 4:28 PM (Answer #2)

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I took a week-long workshop led by Roger Taylor, who promotes multidiscipline, integrated lesson plans. It was nonstop! He covered all the "hot topics," like multiple intelligences, differentiated instruction, and taught us how to write curriculum that incorporates it all. I learned a great deal from him, and even if I might not do everything he teaches, my planning has been influenced by him.

Check out his web site:

http://www.rogertaylor.com/

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teacherscribe | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

Posted December 4, 2008 at 12:37 PM (Answer #3)

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William Daggett Jr spoke at our school a few years ago, and it was a real wake up call.  Harry Wong spoke to us too about a decade ago, but his was more aimed at the elementary teachers (I'm teach secondary).

Daggett was quite controversial with his doom and gloom philosophy about Americans becoming apathetic and falling behind developing countries; however, in light of the government report "A Democracy at Risk," I think it was pretty spot on.

See the link below for the pdf file of the report.

www.forumforeducation.org/upload_files/files/FED_ReportRevised415.pdf

A lot of what Daggett has to say about getting our students ready to compete in a global economy has really changed how I teach.

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tpisano | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Assistant Educator

Posted December 4, 2008 at 5:25 PM (Answer #4)

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I went to a seminar with Kylene Beers at Columbia two years ago. Although it was not Professional Development, it was the most informative,inspiring, seminar I have ever been to.   This woman amazes me. I re-read her book over and over again.

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renkins44 | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

Posted December 5, 2008 at 11:44 AM (Answer #5)

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My best has been reading "Heroic Leadership" by Chris Lowney. He is a member of The Society of Jesus and an executive at JP Morgan. he discusses how Emotional Intelligence is vital to energizing ambitions and raising awareness. He founds his claims on the success of the more than 450 years of flourishing Jesuit existence, which includes, but certainly is not limited to, creating and growing some of the best colleges in the world. The Jesuit training is timeless and has seen steady success longer than almost any other company based on the training techniques they used for both recruits and senior members alike.

Perhaps what I like best about the book is that does not "prescribe" a method to follow or specific teaching techniques, but instead focuses on harboring ingenuity that is relevant in any classroom in any geographic location.

In addition, the best professional developmenet I have done is simply to take 15 minutes twice a day to ask myself if I have achieved the respective day's goals. In other words, I examine what I've done, how I've done it, and how I can do it better next time. In doing so, we recognize our personal weaknesses and develop strategies to overcome them.  

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mthibodeau | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Adjunct Educator

Posted December 7, 2008 at 8:24 PM (Answer #6)

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I learned a lot about literacy from a session with Doug Fisher.

I have also found the Reading Insitute for Academic Preparation program at the California State University to be highly valuable in providing me tools and strategies to increase my students' academic literacy.  It has been far more useful and relevant than any of my credential or master's classes.

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted February 14, 2011 at 12:21 PM (Answer #7)

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The best professional development I ever had was an AP vertical teaming seminar from the College Board.  It literally transformed my teaching of English.  I have seen continued to teach higher-level classes, and it has helped me to refine my skills.  I wish I could go to more of these trainings, but my private school budget will not allow.  If you have a chance, go for it!

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niokate | Student

Posted October 22, 2011 at 2:26 PM (Answer #8)

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The Best Professional Development

In your experience, what professional development activity has most benefitted your teaching career? I have been through programs as diverse as Kagan, CRISS, Willard Daggett's seminars, and Harry Wong. Over the long haul, however, I've found that a lot of the training I received in actual education classes has been most beneficial.

Speaking of which (slightly off topic), I will soon be taking the GRE to pursue my master's. If anyone has excellent study guides they can suggest or even sell, please let me know. --End of shameless plug --

Here's the bottom line: whatever professional development activities have most impacted your teaching, those are the ones others will most likely benefit from, as well. List them here, s'il vous plait...

I ha have attended different teacher programs, but the most baneficial was <a href="http://www.themotivationalspeaker.biz/">professional development for teachers</a> . The impact was quite valuable for the further career.

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niokate | Student

Posted October 22, 2011 at 2:28 PM (Answer #9)

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The Best Professional Development

In your experience, what professional development activity has most benefitted your teaching career? I have been through programs as diverse as Kagan, CRISS, Willard Daggett's seminars, and Harry Wong. Over the long haul, however, I've found that a lot of the training I received in actual education classes has been most beneficial.

Speaking of which (slightly off topic), I will soon be taking the GRE to pursue my master's. If anyone has excellent study guides they can suggest or even sell, please let me know. --End of shameless plug --

Here's the bottom line: whatever professional development activities have most impacted your teaching, those are the ones others will most likely benefit from, as well. List them here, s'il vous plait...

I have attended different teacher programs, but the most baneficial was professional development training offered by http://www.themotivationalspeaker.biz/. The impact was quite valuable for the further career.

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niokate | Student

Posted October 22, 2011 at 2:29 PM (Answer #10)

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I have attended different teacher programs, but the most baneficial was professional development training offered by www.themotivationalspeaker.biz The impact was quite valuable for the further career.

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