Author's Message in a "Thousand Splendid Suns"?What is the author's message in a "Thousand Splendid Suns"?

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junebug614's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #2)

The author's message is technically referred to as the  theme, which is the overarching idea that the author presents.  Generally the theme is a message about life, or the "moral" of the story. 

 When thinking about the theme of this novel, think about what the main characters learned.  Mostly, the women of the story learned the benefits and consequences of love, and how that love can destruct or compliment a person. 

pmiranda2857's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #3)

The author's message is one of hope.  At the end of the story, Tariq and Laila are reunited with their daughter and she gets away from the cruel and violent Rasheed. 

"Laila and Tariq run away with both children and live in Pakistan. But after the United States invades Afghanistan, the family returns to Kabul. Their love for each other, as well as their love for their homeland, despite its cruelties and harshness and hardships, ends the novel on a high note, suggesting the possibility of a better future."


kukarad70's profile pic

Posted on (Answer #4)

Author of  A Thousand Splendid Suns, Khaled Hosseini, he is careful to see peaceful Afghanistan. He wants to give message that the end of tyranny and cruel people is confirmed as Rasheed met the same line and lost his life. Human respect is needed in every step and same thing the protagonists of this novel were seeking beginning to end of this novel. Domination is the main cause of mental segregation and building the chances of chaos.

Human life is for once and it should pass with consuming every facility and the women of Afghanistan were kept aside and should tolerate the pain domination in every step whether in or outside the house. Khaled Hosseini actually is fighting for existing freedom which we can find in the novel. Brilliant and tricky run of pen made him popular in the land of Afghanistan throughout his criticisms The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns, but in both he has expressed his idea for freedom in different ways.

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