Homework Help

Attn: Literature Lovers! Favorite Book Quotes?I try to teach my students to love words,...

user profile pic

charcunning | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Assistant Educator

Posted March 11, 2009 at 8:30 PM via web

dislike 1 like
Attn: Literature Lovers! Favorite Book Quotes?

I try to teach my students to love words, to love language--the way it sounds out loud, the way it is written on the page...

Nothing makes me happier than when I see quotes from books we've read on my students' myspace profiles!! :)

One thing I make them do when we read is to choose the MOST IMPORTANT sentence from a passage or section or essay etc...this is harder than it sounds! Then they have to justify WHY it's most important...and sometimes the answer is, "because it's beautiful"! Love that!

What are some of your favorite quotes from books that have this sense of beauty to them?

Here's one from Cry, The Beloved Country--just read it this week!

"Allow me a minute...

And nothing more. Those fingers would not write any more. Allow me a minute. I hear a sound in the kitchen. Allow me a minute, while I go to my death. Allow me a thousand minutes, I am not coming back any more."

Amazing!! Have fun! :) And if you do anything interesting with quotes in your classroom, please share!!

11 Answers | Add Yours

user profile pic

maria-vivanco | Student, Grade 11 | Valedictorian

Posted January 26, 2014 at 5:34 AM (Answer #11)

dislike 1 like

"Eleanor was right. She never looked nice. She looked like art, and art wasn't supposed to look nice; it was supposed to make you feel something." 

This is from my favorite book Eleanor and Park. I find this quote beautiful because Eleanor's character dressed sloppily and she is often bullied for it but Park tells her that he loves perfectly. He knows that she dresses weird and looks like guy but he doesn't care. Because he's in love. 

user profile pic

mizzwillie | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted May 6, 2014 at 2:58 PM (Answer #12)

dislike 1 like

To Charcunning:  You asked if anyone did anything with quotes.  As a teacher, I believe that choosing the most important sentence in any piece of writing forces a reader to really think about the meaning and purpose of the piece.  I used to use Shakespeare famous quotes and have them explain in groups why these had stood the test of time.  Then,for fun, we would study Shakespearean insults which led to then writing our own.  We did a few in class together, then one in a group of four, and then one or two in pairs.  Rules about picking on people were very strict.  I allowed them to use me to insult in fun such as talking with my hands etc. Sharing was hilarious, and the students were quite creative in using Shakespearean language.  Then they had to decide if any of their work was a quote worth keeping which led to interesting discussions among my advanced classes about the power of language and why something was considered important.  I don't know if this is what you really wanted, but it was a day worth doing for the discussion afterwards.  Have fun. 

user profile pic

litchick2011 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Assistant Educator

Posted March 13, 2009 at 10:30 AM (Answer #2)

dislike 0 like

"Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgiastic future that year by year recedes before us.  It eluded us then, but that's no matter -- tomorrow we will run faster, stretch our arms farther...And one fine morning -

So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past."

The Great Gatsby

I love the juxtaposition of both hope and despair...how we constantly struggle to move forward, yet we will constantly be forced back.

user profile pic

afi80fl | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Assistant Educator

Posted March 14, 2009 at 1:04 PM (Answer #3)

dislike 0 like

"Don't ever tell anyone anything.  If you do, you start missing everybody."  ~The Catcher in the Rye

I love the deep meaning of how Holden is somehow extroverted, processing the world around him through talking things out and telling his story.  It's also sad just how vulnerable remembering important parts of your life makes you.  There's a little Holden Caufield in all of us, I think.

user profile pic

decembersnow | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted March 15, 2009 at 4:41 AM (Answer #4)

dislike 0 like

"Everybody was born like a white sheet paper, tabula rasa , without any idea"

John Locke

It gives strength to us.  John Locke is explaining the real status of the nature of human understanding

user profile pic

amy-lepore | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted March 25, 2009 at 9:54 AM (Answer #5)

dislike 0 like

How about this from Frankenstein:  "During my youthful days discontent never visited my mind; and if I was ever overcome by ennui, the sight of what is beautiful in nature, or the study of what is excellent and sublime in the productions of man, could always interest my heart, and communicate elasticity to my spirits.  But I am a blasted tree; the bolt has entered my soul; and I felt then that should I survive to exhibit, what I shall soon cease to be--a miserable spectacle of wrecked humanity, pitiable to others, and intolerable to myself."

This is Victor explaining to Robert Walton his view of life after the creature has murdered everyone he cared about and he is on the ship telling Walton the story of his life.

user profile pic

decembersnow | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted March 26, 2009 at 4:56 PM (Answer #6)

dislike 0 like

To the wrtier of No5 ...

This Quotes poked my heart ... Nice ...

user profile pic

Michelle Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

Posted March 31, 2009 at 6:30 AM (Answer #7)

dislike 0 like

From the Lord of Language himself, Oscar Wilde

(O.W)"America had often been discovered before Columbus, but it had always been hushed up."

(The Importance of Being Earnest) "To lose one parent, Mr Worthing, may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose both looks like carelessness."

(The Importance of Being Earnest)"I don't play accurately-any one can play accurately- but I play with wonderful expression. As far as the piano is concerned, sentiment is my forte. I keep science for Life. "

(Lady Windermere's Fan, Act 1) "It is absurd to divide people into good and bad. People are either charming or tedious."

(Critic as an Artist) "But what is the difference between literature and journalism?
...Journalism is unreadable and literature is not read. That is all."

(The Importance of Being Earnest) "Thirty-five is a very attractive age. London society is full of women of the very highest birth who have, of their own free choice, remained thirty-five for years"

I.LOVE.OSCAR.WILDE!

user profile pic

elfgirl | Student, Undergraduate | Salutatorian

Posted April 3, 2009 at 6:42 AM (Answer #8)

dislike 0 like

"Love is a temporary madness, it erupts like volcanoes and then subsides. And when it subsides, you have to make a decision. You have to work out whether your roots have become so entwined together that it is inconceivable that you should ever part. Because this is what love is. Love is not breathlessness, it is not excitement, it is not the promulgation of promises of eternal passion, it is not the desire to mate every second minute of the day, it is not lying awake at night imagining that he is kissing every cranny of your body. No, don't blush, I am telling you some truths. That is just being "in love", which any fool can do. Love itself is what is left over when being in love has burned away, and this is both an art and a fortunate accident."
Louis de Bernières (Captain Corelli's Mandolin)

I really learned from this little speech by wise Doctor Iaanis to his daughter Pelagia, when she falls 'in love' with Captain Corelli. (Louis De Bernieres is perhaps my favourite living writer. A wonderful writer, historian, story-teller and philosopher)

user profile pic

troubador | eNoter

Posted February 7, 2010 at 11:41 PM (Answer #9)

dislike 0 like

"Don't ever tell anyone anything.  If you do, you start missing everybody."  ~The Catcher in the Rye

I love the deep meaning of how Holden is somehow extroverted, processing the world around him through talking things out and telling his story.  It's also sad just how vulnerable remembering important parts of your life makes you.  There's a little Holden Caufield in all of us, I think.

You just (fairly recently) posted my favorite quote from "The Catcher in the Rye"... that last sentence. It's terrific. And I like the "little ...Caulfield in all..." you wrote is true - though when I read that I thouight 'well yes, most of us have been through adolescence already - YA too'...But I also want to post... "I like this line most because of its utter and a flare-of-a-star-burst complete, brief, truth." Thanks a lot for yours post, and I'm glad you read my long one. ...troubador, 2/7/10; if the screen doesn't say it.

 

user profile pic

accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted June 15, 2010 at 2:51 PM (Answer #10)

dislike 0 like

Anyone else like the famous "stiller doom" passage from Jane Eyre? Not just for feminists! It seems to me to express the thirst and desire to want more out of life than perhaps we are offered and to really live life rather than let it live us. I was delighted too when one of my students chose this quote as her favourite recently after having studied Jane Eyre with me in class!

Join to answer this question

Join a community of thousands of dedicated teachers and students.

Join eNotes