Homework Help

assumption or hypothesisMention a relevant assumption or hypothesis from the readings...

user profile pic

kikie | Student, Undergraduate | Salutatorian

Posted March 19, 2012 at 9:44 AM via web

dislike 0 like
assumption or hypothesis

Mention a relevant assumption or hypothesis from the readings for this topic.

- Combs, Terrorism in the Twenty-First Century, Chapter 3: Ideology and Terrorism: Rights From Wrongs?

- Michael Stohl, "The Mystery of The New Global Terrorism: Old Myths, New Realities?" In Kegley, The New Global Terrorism: Characteristics, Causes, Controls, pp. 84-91.  

- Paul Wilkinson, "Why Modern Terrorism? Differentiating Types and Distinguishing Ideological Motivations," in Kegley, The New Global Terrorism: Characteristics, Causes, Controls, pp. 106-138.

- Mark Juergensmeyer, "The Religious Roots of Contemporary Terrorism," In Kegley, The New Global Terrorism: Characteristics, Causes, Controls, pp. 185-193.

    David C. Rapoport,"Fear and Trembling: Terrorism in Three Different Traditions," In Mahan and Griset, Terrorism in Perspective, pp. 47-68.

7 Answers | Add Yours

user profile pic

vangoghfan | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted March 19, 2012 at 3:24 PM (Answer #2)

dislike 0 like

Mark Juergensmeyer, "The Religious Roots of Contemporary Terrorism."

This article, which isn't easily accessible on the web, seems to assume that contemporary terrorism is often rooted in deep-seated religious convictions. It would be hard to argue with this claim, as the history of the past twenty yeas (at least) seems to provide plenty of evidence to support it.

user profile pic

accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted March 19, 2012 at 5:13 PM (Answer #3)

dislike 0 like

In response to #2, I wonder whether one way we could analyse this assumption that terrorism is based on religious convictions by thinking about the ways in which terrorism is also a product of nationalism or Western dominance in the world. This is something that could be used to usefully question such claims. From the various titles of the articles that you have written about, it seems clear that the roots of terrorism and its links to religious beliefs are a key component of the ideas represented in your texts.

user profile pic

rrteacher | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted March 19, 2012 at 10:47 PM (Answer #4)

dislike 0 like

I'm familiar with a couple of these writers. David Rapaport has emphasized the variety of forms terrorism has taken over the years. He has discussed terrorism in Russia (anarchist terrorists in the nineteenth century; anti-colonial terrorism; leftist terrorism; and now religious terrorism. So religious beliefs are indeed key to the particular brand of terror we are faced with today, there are other forms that terror can take linked to particular times and situations. Paul Wilkinson, on the other hand, is more interested in how terrorism can be contained or dealt with by liberal democracies. Certainly this entails some aspects of what accessteacher is talking about, as it emphasizes how terror relates to Western dominance and how it is harder to control in a liberal state with civil liberties protections.

user profile pic

belarafon | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted March 20, 2012 at 8:58 AM (Answer #5)

dislike 0 like

Modern terrorism is a specific function of religion rather than politics. We cannot compare Al Queda to the IRA, since the former's purposeless attacks are entirely meant to foster fear and submission, while the latter intended to free their nation from oppression by England. Al Queda intends only to destroy the Western world with terrorist attacks; the IRA intended to raise awareness and fight against an occupying nation.

user profile pic

enotechris | College Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

Posted March 20, 2012 at 9:13 PM (Answer #6)

dislike 0 like

What's the difference between guerilla warfare and terrorism? One could argue that warfare, in whatever its form, is politically or religiously motivated; looking deeper at the religious argument, however, leads to a political argument; deeper still leads to an economic one.  

 

user profile pic

litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted March 25, 2012 at 10:31 AM (Answer #7)

dislike 0 like
What most of these sources have in common is trying to understand terrorism. They indicate that terrorism is in the eye of the beholder. Terrorists have different motives, including religious and political ones, and understanding their motivations is one of the keys to successfully intervening in order to stop these organizations.
user profile pic

K.P.L. Hardison | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

Posted April 3, 2012 at 10:44 AM (Answer #8)

dislike 0 like

Paul Wilkinson hypothesizes that motivations for terrorism vary with the ideological roots of the various terrorist groups. This suggests that as there is not only one terrorist group, so there is not only one motive for terrorism.

Join to answer this question

Join a community of thousands of dedicated teachers and students.

Join eNotes