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Any recomendations?I'm looking for a new series to dive into. Or just more good books...

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reginaxo | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 27, 2009 at 9:25 AM via web

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Any recomendations?

I'm looking for a new series to dive into. Or just more good books to add to my collection. :) I like Jodi Picoult, Alice Sebold and the like. Thanks!

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archteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Adjunct Educator

Posted December 27, 2009 at 9:56 AM (Answer #2)

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When I was your age, I really liked A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith.  It follows a girl named Francie as she grows up around the turn of the century.  You might also like Amy Tan.  Most people start with The Joy Luck Club, but her other novels are just as good.  I really enjoyed The Hundred Secret Senses.  One of her newer books, Saving Fish from Drowning, is good as well, but it is very different from the others.  I would put that one on hold until after I had read a couple of her others.  Lately, my female students have all been reading The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants (fiction) and are giving it positive reviews.  I haven't read it though, so I can't say either way.

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mkcapen1 | Middle School Teacher | Valedictorian

Posted December 27, 2009 at 10:16 AM (Answer #3)

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There are so many excellent writers and books out there at present with more to come.  Based on the materials that you state you have read, you seem to like books that have a range of emotion and depth. 

One book that I highly recommend is "The Book Thief" by Markus Zusak.  The characters in this book are the kind of people that yo want to keep in your life after the book is finished.  It has depth much like Piccolet's books.  None of my students could put it down.

Of course "The Twilight Series" is of course on everyone’s lips these days as teens and adults share their own versions of literary criticism of the series.  I have not read them so I can not make a recommendation.

I continue to recommend older books such as the other person did.  "Little Women" and "Little Men," "Wuthering Heights," and "Johnnie Got His Gun" are a few. 

Mostly though, I recommend walking through a bookstore and picking up a book and reading the information about it.  Books are a form of art and art to be appreciated must respond to a person's mood.  Books are usually chosen by the mood one is in at the time.

However, do read "The Book Thief."  I think it is what you are looking for if you have not read it.

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Michelle Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

Posted December 27, 2009 at 5:43 PM (Answer #4)

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IMHO, if you want to jump into a delicious combo of winged creatures, ultimate endings, and amazing storytelling, you'd be surprised at what James Patterson has to offer in his Maximum Ride series. I happen to like his regular style, but to see him displaying this amount of fantastic creativity makes him all the more exciting when you compare his works.

For more info, you can also go to ijbooks.com

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readerofbooks | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted December 27, 2009 at 8:07 PM (Answer #5)

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It is always great to meet a reader. I, too, am a bibliophile. I recommend the classics. The reason why they are classics is because they have passed the test of time. This is important to me, because this fact shows that generations of people have benefited and loved these works. So, how about you read some of the works of the Ancient Greek and Romans. For history, read Tacitus. He has an amazing anti-epic quality to him. For poetry, read some Vergil and Homer. For comedy, read some Aristophanes. For tragedy, read some Euripides and Sophocles. For a more religious angle, have you ever thought of reading the Bible? Also consider, Ovid and Polybius. This list is random, but all worth reading. Also check out my blog, I periodically put up book review.

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ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted December 28, 2009 at 5:32 PM (Answer #6)

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Three books I would suggest are The Wizard Heir, The Warrior Heir, and the Dragon Heir this is a delightful New York times bestseller series by the author Cinda Williams Chima. They are a realistic fantasy series with well developed characters and believable plotlines. There was also enough distinction between the three that one does not get weary with the same old, same old. For a slightly more adult treat that doesn't require a lot of indepth thinking, but is always good for multiple chuckles is the number series by Janet Evanovich--One For the Money, Two for the Dough, and etc.

Feel free to give us your suggestions, and happy reading.

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booksnmore | College Teacher | (Level 3) Adjunct Educator

Posted December 28, 2009 at 7:13 PM (Answer #7)

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I'm not sure how old you are, but as a teen, two of my favorite books were Christy by Catherine Marshall and Rebecca by Daphne Du Marier. Both books are about strong women. Christy is based on a true story and takes place in the Smokey Mountains in a world of immense poverty. Rebecca was, for me, a rather haunting mystery.

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reginaxo | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 28, 2009 at 7:56 PM (Answer #8)

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thank you all for the suggestions, i take it as a compliment that you have all reccomended classics although im more interested in current novels.
im not very into fantasy or classics (however well-written they may be). i like deep, meaningful, depressing (for lack of a better word) books. does that make sense? sorry to be so picky, but to be engrossed, i need a deep story line.

again, thank you for all the suggestions! any and all others are greatly appreciated. 

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imrul23 | Student, Grade 10 | eNoter

Posted December 29, 2009 at 12:57 AM (Answer #9)

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twilight definitely is not a great feat of storytelling.Harry Potter of course is amazing.I recommend not reading sagas as they're pretty boring,i guess :P how about books by Coelho and Khaled Hosseini?The Kite Runner is one book you shud definitely read.

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reginaxo | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted December 29, 2009 at 11:15 AM (Answer #10)

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twilight definitely is not a great feat of storytelling.Harry Potter of course is amazing.I recommend not reading sagas as they're pretty boring,i guess :P how about books by Coelho and Khaled Hosseini?The Kite Runner is one book you shud definitely read.

I LOVED the kite runner. although i had to read it for school, which made it lose some appeal, I definitely enjoyed it. I also read The Alchemist, by Coehlo. amazing book as well. and i love harry potter (:

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Susan Hurn | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted January 3, 2010 at 1:50 AM (Answer #11)

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reginaxo, your last posting above has made me curious. You loved The Kite Runner, but reading it for school made it less appealing. How so? Do we English teachers manage to "kill" books for our students? Please explain! I think this is important!

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imrul23 | Student, Grade 10 | eNoter

Posted January 6, 2010 at 9:04 AM (Answer #12)

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i agree with reginaxo.I remember reading Animal Farm in school-the teacher totally ruined it,i mean totally!it was like a history lesson on Soviet Russia rather than an English class.The same thing happened with Lord of the Flies...:S Two AMAZING books ruined ;P no offence to any english teachers of course!

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linda-allen | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted January 6, 2010 at 1:36 PM (Answer #13)

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Have you read the books about Tally Youngblood by Scott Westerfeld? They include Pretties, Uglies, and Specials. I thought they were really interesting. It's not a series (yet), but if you like the Harry Potter books, you might like The Prophecy of the Sisters by Michelle Zink. Tithe by Holly Black is a fascinating book too.

Hope that helps.

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reginaxo | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 8, 2010 at 5:03 PM (Answer #14)

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reginaxo, your last posting above has made me curious. You loved The Kite Runner, but reading it for school made it less appealing. How so? Do we English teachers manage to "kill" books for our students? Please explain! I think this is important!

I had to read it for history actually, but either way, reading for school just makes a book lose its appeal. While reading The Kite Runner, it felt like such a drag and since I knew I had a deadline it just made me want to read it less. I like reading when I can choose the book and I don't feel pressured to finish it. I like to absorb it and enjoy it, if it's a topic I'm interested in. Now I know I won't be interested in every book, mostly because the curriculum just doesn't fit into my taste in books. After finishing The Kite Runner, and after having it sink in, I realized what an amazing story it was. I guess I tend to automatically dislike a book if it's required for school. Do I have a very good reason why? No. But that's just me... (:

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dagreen517 | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 9, 2010 at 10:33 AM (Answer #15)

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As an elementary teacher, I'm not 100% up to date on teen books.  I do however like to read ones that are more on the controversial side and some that may help me to better understand what my two daughters may experience as they get older.  Your explanation of what you prefer to read doesn't sounds like quite a few of what I have read so far such as This Lullaby written by Sarah Dessen.  The others I am thinking about are currently being read by friends of mine who also have daughters.  I will get bak to you with those titles and authors when the books are returned to me.  My most favorite of controversial books, based on individual thoughts of religion, is the book Fly by Night by Frances Hardinge.  Books are banned and those who have the gift or reading are considered evil as they have knwledge other than what the Duke and the Lady would like them to believe as they try to take over other lands.  I loved this book and thought I would read it to my students, but it would require much more in-depth discussion regarding beliefs than are acceptable today.  Hopefully you will enjoy either of these books and othrs I would love to suggest to you.

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reginaxo | Student, Grade 10 | eNotes Newbie

Posted January 9, 2010 at 12:37 PM (Answer #16)

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As an elementary teacher, I'm not 100% up to date on teen books.  I do however like to read ones that are more on the controversial side and some that may help me to better understand what my two daughters may experience as they get older.  Your explanation of what you prefer to read doesn't sounds like quite a few of what I have read so far such as This Lullaby written by Sarah Dessen.  The others I am thinking about are currently being read by friends of mine who also have daughters.  I will get bak to you with those titles and authors when the books are returned to me.  My most favorite of controversial books, based on individual thoughts of religion, is the book Fly by Night by Frances Hardinge.  Books are banned and those who have the gift or reading are considered evil as they have knwledge other than what the Duke and the Lady would like them to believe as they try to take over other lands.  I loved this book and thought I would read it to my students, but it would require much more in-depth discussion regarding beliefs than are acceptable today.  Hopefully you will enjoy either of these books and othrs I would love to suggest to you.

I enjoy controversial books as well, and I would LOVE reading a book like Fly By Night in school but as you said, too controversial. I like books that have deep meaning and make you think - that's why The Lovely Bones is my favorite book. I find the Sarah Dessen books to be a lighter version of what I normally like to read. I like to think of myself having a more mature taste in literature; I can't wait to hear your suggestions!

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scarletpimpernel | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted January 9, 2010 at 4:37 PM (Answer #17)

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If you liked The Kite Runner, I think that you would enjoy Hosseini's second book, A Thousand Splendid Suns.  It's told from two characters' point of view and features what women have to go through living in Afghanistan under Taliban rule.

Jodi Picoult is one of my favorite current authors, and she's hard to beat, but there is a new novel entitled The Help by Kathryn Stockett which is very engaging.

If you enjoy reading nonfiction that reads like fiction (such as Alice Sebold's Lucky), then you might like The Glass Castle which follows the author through her very eccentric upbringing or The Overachievers which is an expose featuring real high school students and the pressure put on them to get into elite universities.

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zazsuran | eNotes Newbie

Posted October 19, 2010 at 5:55 AM (Answer #18)

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reginaxo, your last posting above has made me curious. You loved The Kite Runner, but reading it for school made it less appealing. How so? Do we English teachers manage to "kill" books for our students? Please explain! I think this is important!

This might not be the best justification, but I've never liked being forced to read.  I love reading, always have, always will.  But I absolutely hated reading for school, and it didn't bother me that I failed loads of lessons because of it.  Books to me are an escape from the chaos of the world.  When I'm told I HAVE to read something, it absolutely takes the fun out of it.  It becomes an assignment, not an escape. I've always felt very private about how books make me feel, and a lot of younger people ridicule how books make others feel, and I've always hated having to justify why a book made me feel the way that I do.  It makes books impersonal, an assignment, something you're graded and judged on.  I've been out of gradeschool for quite a while now, but I've always held this to be an absolute truth: the best things are never forced, but done for genuine love.

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