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Who suspects Macbeth?Support your answer with lines from Act 2

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denotes | Student, Grade 11 | (Level 1) Honors

Posted November 26, 2010 at 11:57 PM via web

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Who suspects Macbeth?

Support your answer with lines from Act 2

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amymc | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

Posted January 19, 2011 at 11:35 PM (Answer #1)

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As with most crimes, the killer becomes a suspect in the minds of those around him. 

Macduff suspects Macbeth's activities immediately after the discovery of the body.  Macbeth admits to killing the guards which makes Macduff suspicious enough to ask

Wherefore did you so? 

Later, Macduff refuses to attend Macbeth's coronotion worrying that the new direction of the kingdom is evil, as evidenced by his quote from scene iv

Lest our old robes sit easier than our new!

The King's sons flee the scene, afraid for their own live.  They sense that someone close to their father killed him when Donalbain says in scene iii

There's daggers in men's smiles

The Thane of Ross also questions Duncan's sons as suspects because they had really nothing additional to gain from the murder, especially if they ran away!  He says in scene iv

'Gainst nature still!
Thriftless ambition, that wilt ravin up
Thine own life's means!


Ross, Donalbain and, most importantly, Macduff suspect Macbeth in Act II.

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troutmiller | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

Posted January 25, 2011 at 9:10 PM (Answer #1)

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Donalbain and Malcolm decide to flee when they find that their father has been murdered.  They even decide to go separate ways.  This is a quote from Donalbain in Act II, sc 3.

"where we are,
There's daggers in men's smiles: the near in blood,
The nearer bloody."

He knows that someone close to Duncan was the murderer--as said in his last 2 lines.

However, in Act III, Banquo has a better quote that proves he suspects Macbeth.
He says,

"Thou hast it now: king, Cawdor, Glamis, all,
As the weird women promised, and, I fear,
Thou play'dst most foully for't"

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