Homework Help

I am a teacher in search of a grammar textbook, in print or out of print, which will...

amtemple's profile pic

Posted via web

dislike 0 like
I am a teacher in search of a grammar textbook, in print or out of print, which will focus on analysis.

Can anyone name an elementary grammar book teaching parsing, drawing students slowly to penetrate the nature of words & the structure of sentences, not fill in blanks and jump through hoops of randomly organized grammar worksheets! I would love to see it dovetail with reading and literature, so teachers can supplement with exercises asking for an analysis of a literature sentence, for example.

Thanks, if anyone can point me in the right direction!

5 Answers | Add Yours

hadley818's profile pic

Posted (Answer #2)

dislike 0 like

We do something call Daily Grammar Practice (DGP). There is a DGP publishing website where you can check it out. I believe that it is available for grades 1-12. I teach 11th grade, and we work on one sentence a week. Each day we do something different with the sentence: Monday- correct punctuation, Tuesday-parts of speech, Wednesday-sentence parts, Thursday-sentence type, Friday-diagram. It's a wonderful resource that breaks away from traditional grammar worksheets. The skills build on each other, and it's a great way to do grammar quickly and effectively without a lot of "busy work." I have had students do their own DGP with short stories and exerpts of novels, so it can tie into any type of literature.  

amtemple's profile pic

Posted (Answer #3)

dislike 0 like

We do something call Daily Grammar Practice (DGP). There is a DGP publishing website where you can check it out. I believe that it is available for grades 1-12. I teach 11th grade, and we work on one sentence a week. Each day we do something different with the sentence: Monday- correct punctuation, Tuesday-parts of speech, Wednesday-sentence parts, Thursday-sentence type, Friday-diagram. It's a wonderful resource that breaks away from traditional grammar worksheets. The skills build on each other, and it's a great way to do grammar quickly and effectively without a lot of "busy work." I have had students do their own DGP with short stories and exerpts of novels, so it can tie into any type of literature.  

Thank you, I will look that up! I wonder if it is based on correcting faults, or on analysis of a correct sentence?

For anyone who may be interested, there is a fascinating book available on Google Books, published around 1911, on "How the French Boy Learns to Write" by Rollo Walter Brown of Wabash U.- really good points about tying the curriculum together, and the way of looking at grammar. It was reprinted several times, the latest being 1963, and had somewhat of an influence.

ask996's profile pic

Posted (Answer #5)

dislike 0 like

Absolutely you must check out Daily Grammar Practice. This book immerses students in the world of grammar on a daily basis in the meaningful content of one weekly sentence. The appendix for student use is laid out in sections with a different grammatic unit being addressed each day.

clyonslf's profile pic

Posted (Answer #6)

dislike 0 like

Another wonderful grammar integration program is Grammar with A Giggle by Jane Kessler-Bell.  Some basic concept as the DGP but a whole lot more interesting.

litteacher8's profile pic

Posted (Answer #7)

dislike 0 like
Some literature anthologies include grammar components, and these might work for you since you want to incorporate literature. I also like the Grammardog resources available here on enotes. They tie into specific novels, and include examples from the novels.

Join to answer this question

Join a community of thousands of dedicated teachers and students.

Join eNotes