What are some locations in Maycomb in To Kill a Mockingbird? 

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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When making a map of Maycomb, there are several important places you will need to include.  All of these places have significance to the plot.

The Radley House- The Radley House is important because it is a mythical place for the Finch children, and the source of gossip for the adults in the town.  They Radleys live near the schoolyard.  The Finch children have to pass the house to go to and from school.

 [Our] summertime boundaries (within calling distance of Calpurnia) were Mrs. Henry Lafayette Dubose's house two doors to the north of us, and the Radley Place three doors to the south. (ch 1, p. 3)

There is a tree at the edge of the Radley property where the children find gifts from Boo Radley.  When Scout walks Boo home at the end of the book, she stands on the Radley porch and realizes what life must have been like for him.

Atticus’s House- You can tell where Atticus’s house is from this description, but Scout also comments that they live on the main residential street, so Maycomb is clearly a small town (p. 3).

Miss Rachel (Dill’s aunt) is the Finch’s next door neighbor, with Miss Maudie and Miss Stephanie Crawford down the street.

The courthouse- The courthouse is located downtown and there is a town square.

In rainy weather the streets turned to red slop; grass grew on the sidewalks, the courthouse sagged in the square. (p. 3)

Of course, the courthouse is where one of the book’s most significant events takes place—the trial of Tom Robinson.

The Ewell’s place- The Ewell’s live outside of town near the dump.

Maycomb's Ewells lived behind the town garbage dump in what was once a Negro cabin. The cabin's plank walls were supplemented with sheets of corrugated iron, its roof shingled with tin cans hammered flat … (ch 17, p. 125).

Mayella Ewell’s encounter with Tom Robinson in the Ewell house leads to the events that are pivotal to the book.


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