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All types of Dickensian women pose problems for late 20th-century reader in search of a...

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tienlady | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

Posted April 16, 2012 at 5:28 PM via web

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All types of Dickensian women pose problems for late 20th-century reader in search of a viable dickensian Heroine.why?

dickens groups the women in his novels in three types;angels, fallen sisters and eccentrics. All this types of Dickensian women pose problems for late twentieth-century readers in search of a viable dickensian Heroine.
 Agreed. But why and how?

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florine | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted September 6, 2012 at 8:41 PM (Answer #1)

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         I can see Oliver Twist's Rose Mayley and Nancy as antithetic female figures. Of course, Lucy's character in Tale of two Cities is rather germane to Rose's. In spite of their differences, the French revolutionary woman and the Darnays' English housekeeper may be seen as eccentric or ex-centric even though the way they throw in their lot with French revolutionaries or with the English aristocrat bestows a kind of intensity of feeling, pride and dignity upon them that is bewitching. In Great Expectations, Miss Havisham's presence in the novel is overpowering. Those women may epitomize the versatile ever-changing nature of woman. But the reader is always somehow made to witness the great influence exerted by the ones on the others, one acting, reacting and counteracting the other's, so that although they seem to fit into categories, some of their actions may shock or surprise the reader. They're neither flat nor stock characters conforming to norms and principles. As a result, I think most of them are still attractive for a contemporary reader who can still identify with such memorable female characters.

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