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Are the agents of socialization that affect you today the same as the ones that...

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linnie4352 | Student, Undergraduate | Salutatorian

Posted January 28, 2011 at 12:33 PM via web

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Are the agents of socialization that affect you today the same as the ones that affected you before?

Are the agents of socialization that affect you today the same as the ones that affected you before?

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted January 28, 2011 at 12:53 PM (Answer #2)

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I would imagine that, for most adults, the agents of socialization that affect us today are different from those that affected us earlier in our lives.  This is because we are at a much different place in our development than we were back then.

In our earlier days, we were socialized (or at least I was) by my parents and my teachers.  This is because my opinions and values were not well-formed yet.  Nowadays, I do not think I am being socialized much at all because my values are largely formed by this point.  To the extent that I am still being socialized, it is by people I respect in the media.  I read many editorials by columnists and I suppose that I absorb the values that they are trying to get across.  However, I do not think I absorb them as readily as I absorbed the ideas of my earlier agents of socializtion.  Once again, I am much more set in my values and am able to pick and choose what I agree with from the columnists.

In my earlier days, I believe I was socialized mainly by parents and teachers.  Now, if I am socialized, it is by people like columnists and scholars.

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ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted January 28, 2011 at 7:15 PM (Answer #3)

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I think we are also to some extent socialized by our children and our students. We interact with them and pick up on their cues, and then our response are based on these social and emotional inputs. That doesn't mean we set aside our earlier socialization, but we do adapt somewhat.

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lmetcalf | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted January 28, 2011 at 8:59 PM (Answer #4)

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As our lives change I would think that the poeple around us influence our socialization.  18+ years of a parents influence creates a foundation, but with each new experience comes a new opportunity to have one's socialization amended.  Teachers, employers, colleagues, friends, media etc. all play role throughout our lives.  We always think that children are impressionable, and they are, but I think we all are.

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted January 29, 2011 at 10:55 AM (Answer #5)

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We need to recognise the role that changing technology has on our socialisation as well. This, combined with globalisation, means that our socialisation is influenced by many more different forces and powers than before. The rise of the internet has meant that we are influenced by many more different voices and groups across the world that previously we did not have access to.

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted January 29, 2011 at 12:27 PM (Answer #6)

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There is an artificiality to what influences enter into the socialization of people in the world today.  Facebook, Twitter, and all the media that young people rely upon to provide them with opinions, perspectives, and even moral judgments are in so many ways cursory, contradictory, misleading, and situational.

The constant frameworks of true and solid interpersonal relationships with friends and family seem to be missing in what is termed "socialization."

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megan-bright | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted January 29, 2011 at 1:16 PM (Answer #7)

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As we grow and develop we become way more complex in regards to what affects us. I can certainly say that my parents and family have also been my primary modes of socialization, even more powerful than my friends, teachers, classmates etc.

As I grow older and develop more meaningful relationships with a wider range of people, I can say that I can add co-workers, customers (when I was in retail), and students to that equation.

Also, with getting married and having a child, my husband and child is key, as well as in-laws and my husband's friends.

Finally, the internet as played a tremendous role in my life (not necessarily social media). From attending online classes to planning important life events and meeting people, it has definitely been a major socialization agent in my life.

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lrwilliams | College Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted January 30, 2011 at 6:47 AM (Answer #8)

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I think that as we grow older we are most definitely influenced by many outside sources. As we grow up our immediate family is the biggest influence. As we enter school our peers and teachers are part of our socialization. As we become adults we add co-workers and a sometimes new group of peers. I feel that these changes in our outside influences is what causes us to grow as individuals.

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brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted January 31, 2011 at 4:11 PM (Answer #9)

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We are socialized most heavily by our primary social groups, which at younger ages include mostly family members and close school friends.  Once the artificial society of school is removed, we replace it with work influences and our spouses who socialize in some decidedly different ways.

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amy-lepore | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted February 2, 2011 at 7:19 AM (Answer #10)

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I think not.  The younger one is, the more obsessed with friends and what others think of him or her...they are more prone to peer pressure, fads, and jumping at an idea before fully thinking it through.  As one gets older, and presumably wiser, one does not depend so much on this adolescent idea of acceptance and popularity.  One is much more apt to think decisions through completely before acting, and to weigh all the options before finally coming to a decision.

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litteacher8 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted February 5, 2011 at 9:15 PM (Answer #11)

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I agree with what others have said.  I also think that some things remain the same.  For example, we are still affected by our friends as adults.  We still care what they think, want them to like us, and want to like the same things they do.  Since our friends change as we age, they are not exactly the same agents of socialization, but friends are still an agent of socialization no matter what age we are.

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booboosmoosh | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

Posted February 28, 2011 at 8:48 PM (Answer #12)

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The agents of socialization that affect me today are very different than those that affected me when I was younger.

Maturity has a great deal to do with how society affects us. When we are young and impressionable, we are more likely to listen to what people say and what they tell us to do. As a child, any adult was seen as correct. Doctors were never questioned. Teachers were respected. (That may be a rumor...)

Today, if I have a question about something someone tells me, I ask or research it. I don't take things at face value. If a doctor or nurse tells me to do something that doesn't ring true, I question it. If society worships the young, I dont' ignore it because I am no longer twenty, but I dismiss it because now that I'm not twenty, I realize that a great deal that we are told is just not true. And commercials? What messages they send! Now I turn them off.

I am more my own person, and I think things through more than I did in my twenties. I tend to not believe all I hear, and I don't believe the urban folklore that a woman returned from a foreign country with a "chihuahua" that was really a sewer rat. It's different now.

So now I spend my time trying to teach my daughter the same lessons I have learned...and am still learning...

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