After talking with Cherry, what reason does Pony finally give for the separation between Greasers and Socs?

3 Answers | Add Yours

bullgatortail's profile pic

bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Ponyboy discovers some new things about the lives of the Socs each time he talks with Cherry Valance. By the end of the story, Pony has become the top greaser authority on Socs, as his essay discloses. He actually comes to determine that people are just people--there are both good and bad greasers and Socs. But after his talk with Cherry at the drive-in, she makes several good points about the primary differences. It's not just the Socs' money that makes them different, she tells Pony.

"You greasers have a different set of values. You're more emotional. We're sophisticated--cool to the point of not feeling anything. Nothing is real for us... I don't mean half of what I'm saying.

Unlike the greasers, the Socs are caught up in a "rat race."

"We're always going and going and going, and never asking where. Did you ever hear of having more than you wanted? So that you couldn't want anything else and then started looking for something else to want? It seems like we're always searching for something else to satisfy us, and never finding it. Maybe if we could lose our cool, we could."

The differences, according to Pony (and Cherry) were that the Socs were cold, aloof and impersonal. It was the greasers' emotional view of their lives that separated them most.

ik9744's profile pic

ik9744 | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted on

One separation is that the Greasers gets the problems in life and gets jumped while the Socs are easy living and have rich stuff. While the Greasers have problems with money, where they live, and life. While they still get jumped on. 

somebody's profile pic

somebody | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

After talking with Cherry, Pony finally finds that it wasn't only because of money they were seperated it was because of their emotion.

We’ve answered 317,377 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question