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In Act II, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet,  Romeo uses a metaphor to explain how he...

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katiejov | Elementary School Teacher | Honors

Posted December 12, 2010 at 2:45 AM via web

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In Act II, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet,  Romeo uses a metaphor to explain how he feels.  What is the metaphor?

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clairewait | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted December 12, 2010 at 3:42 AM (Answer #1)

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In this scene, Romeo approaches his friend Friar Lawrence just after he has fallen in love with Juliet (presumably, this is merely the next day and possibly Romeo has not yet slept).  He says:

I'll tell thee, ere thou ask it me again.
I have been feasting with mine enemy,
Where on a sudden one hath wounded me,
That's by me wounded: both our remedies
Within thy help and holy physic lies:
I bear no hatred, blessed man, for, lo,
My intercession likewise steads my foe.

"One hath wounded me" is not simply a metaphor, but it is ironic as well.  He is speaking of his "enemies" the Capulets, and to say he is wounded suggests that he has been hurt in a fight.  How typical.  Ironically, this time, his wound is not physical.  His heart is wounded because he has fallen in love with a woman he cannot publicly marry.  The friar holds the "remedy" for this wound if he will agree to marry the two in private.

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missy575 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted December 12, 2010 at 3:54 AM (Answer #2)

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Romeo uses two metaphors together:

I'll tell thee, ere thou ask it me again.
I have been feasting with mine enemy,
Where on a sudden one hath wounded me,
That's by me wounded: both our remedies
Within thy help and holy physic lies:

The bolded metaphor compares his experience with Juliet to an eating experience. Eating involves consuming and digesting. Each of these great actions make clear the connection to a love relationship. Romeo demonstrates the internal fulfillment he is getting from the connection to Juliet, although he has yet to reveal which enemy he has been feasting with.

Then, the italicized portion--which I believe is the greater metaphor--compares their love connection to the connection between two enemies. Enemies hurt each other. Using the sense of wounding each other, Romeo asks the friar to remedy the wounding of each other by marrying them. This wounding rings true with love because a cancelled love, or love that cannot be fulfilled physically, hurts. For Romeo the only solution will be a full and complete commitment, just like marriage can provide.

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rionray | eNotes Newbie

Posted July 23, 2012 at 8:42 PM (Answer #3)

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hi

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