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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Teaching Unit

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Teaching Unit

Excerpt From this Document

  • Explain why this novel is sometimes seen as a “rite of passage” story. Consider how Huck is at the beginning, what ordeals he undergoes, and how he survives at the end.
  • Define the term “irony” and cite four examples from the novel that support your definition.
  • By citing incidents from the novel, demonstrate that a major theme is “man’s inhumanity to man.”
  • Trace the development of Huck’s troubled conscience. What is his problem, and how does he finally resolve it?
  • Explain why Huck decides to “light out” for the Indian territory rather than stay with Aunt Sally and be “sivilized” again.
  • Prove the following thesis by citing passages or incidents from the novel: On the river, Huck finds peace and freedom. When on land, he has to deal with human gullibility, greed, corruption, and cruelty.
  • In what ways is Jim a less-developed character at the beginning and at the end of the novel than he is in the middle of the novel?
  • List as many points of contrast as you can between Tom and Huck.

About this Document

A teaching unit and individual learning packet from Prestwick House. Includes the following: comprehensive chapter-by-chapter study guides for students; questions suitable for essay topics or discussion; vocabulary lists; multiple-choice and essay test with answer key; introductory material from Prestwick House to familiarize both students and teachers with the work.

Tags: Lesson Plans, Literature, Prestwick House, Teaching Unit, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Teaching Unit The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Teaching Unit The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Teaching Unit The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Teaching Unit The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Teaching Unit The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Teaching Unit